T143 College Die

This page is about the final project done at George Brown College for the Die Making component of the program.
This may be alittle out of date or not exactly to what drawings are used today. However this is the drawings used
when I went through the program, and these are the drawings I produced my die to.

These drawings were drawn up by the shop Professor Robert Mattingley. As you can see its all hand sketched,
with all the dimensions really required to produce the die set, as well as it shows you what dimensions are
marked using the " * " on the drawing where appropriate.

For a more detailed view click on the picture, it will load the whole picture.



The above shows you the top view of the bottom shoe, the front assembled view and the right side sectional view.



This page shows us the top shoe drawing, as well as a suggested list of shapes that we could make. It also lists the
Bill of materials, as well as a note to "scale for missing sizes" which means we were allowed to interpret the drawing
for the missing sizes and come up with them on our own. However I do believe the most important part of the page is
our tolerances! Without them we cannot be sure that we are producing the die set to a acceptable level of quality.
And yes there is a marking scheme and you can indeed fail the project by a variety of ways.


As you can see Mattingley gave us written details of the specifications he required and how he wanted us to produce the parts.
This was a time saver due to the ability to simply use his instructions on the page and get the job done instead of wondering
how to do each step to his satisfaction. Because no matter what we produce, everything has to make the customer happy in
a machine shop. If they are not happy, we aren't happy.


And finally the drawing for the pierce punch.

Over all as you can see its all layed out and its really not that complicated. I think the hardest part
of this whole project was using the 4-jaw chuck on the lathe for the first time!

My completed Die Set, after assembly with all the punches and I had already ran the die once. (Yes that is my locker in the background).


And the token I produced:



Dimitrios Simitas


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